Queens Museum extends exhibits
Jan 20, 2021 | 2232 views | 0 0 comments | 327 327 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Conference of the Animals
The Conference of the Animals
slideshow
After the Plaster Foundation, or, ‘Where can we live?'
After the Plaster Foundation, or, ‘Where can we live?'
slideshow
Four of the exhibits currently on display at the Queens Museum recently announced extensions, allowing the public to continue visiting the museum for free.

• Bruce Davidson: Outsider on the Inside (through February 28): Bruce Davidson: Outsider on the Inside brings together more than a hundred photographs by legendary Magnum Photos member and Henri Cartier-Bresson mentee, Bruce Davidson.

Ranging from study prints to rare vintage items, the exhibited works showcase Davidson’s singular ability to chronicle unmediated instances of candor and emotion activated by New York urban space.

• Ulrike Müller and Amy Zion: The Conference of the Animals (through January 31): The Conference of the Animals consists of a mural by artist Ulrike Müller and an exhibition of children’s drawings by independent curator Amy Zion.

This project takes its title from German writer Erich Kästner’s children’s book The Animal’s Conference (1949) written in the aftermath of World War II. The story is a political satire about a group of animals who, frustrated by the inefficacy of human international conferences, convene to save the planet.

• After the Plaster Foundation, or, ‘Where can we live?' (through February 28): After the Plaster Foundation, or, “Where can we live?” is an exhibition of twelve artists and artist groups with roots in New York City asking critical questions about home, property, and the Earth, and who has access to these things under capitalism.

• Ridgewood Reservoir for the 21st Century (through July 30): In 1858, The Ridgewood Reservoir was built on the Brooklyn-Queens border to hold the fresh water supply for the once independent City of Brooklyn.

Ridgewood Reservoir for the 21st Century traces the 160-year transformation of the site from the construction of its three water basins to its invaluable role today as a 50 acre open space in Highland Park, a green oasis allowing for close encounters with nature.

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